Do you know Kabrita goat milk is A2 milk? - Kabrita Cambodia

Do you know Kabrita goat milk is A2 milk?

Recently, A1 and A2 milk have gained a lot of interest. But what exactly are A1 and A2 milk ? To better understand that , we have to take a closer look at the milk in which we can find them . Milk is composed of different macronutrients; like fats, carbohydrates and proteins. In milk, 2 major groups of proteins can be identified: whey proteins and casein proteins. The most abundant proteins in milk are A1 and A2 caseins. Conventional cow’s milk is composed of a mixture of A1 and A2 caseins and is usually referred to as “A1 milk”. Goat milk only contains A2 casein and is therefore referred to as “A2 milk”.

 

Common complaints about A1 proteins

A number of recently published studies have shown that A1 milk, commonly found in cow’s milk, can cause health issues such as constipation, discomfort, loose stool and bowel inflammation in some individuals and perhaps even in some babies.[2,3,4]A1 milk may contribute to these common tummy troubles because as A1 milk is broken down in the digestive system, it releases a short beta casomorphin peptide known as BCM-7.[5] BCM-7 has been shown to interact with opiate receptors in the gut to slow gastrointestinal transit.[6] Longer transit times may allow for increased fermentation of short-chain carbohydrates in the gut, causing gas, bloating and discomfort.

Common complaints about A1 proteins

Benefits of A2 protein

A2 protein is easier to digest, less chance of issues such as constipation, discomfort, loose stool and bowel inflammation (2,3,4).

Kabrita Goat milk protein has only A2 protein

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Benefits of A2 protein

[2] Pensabene, L., Salvatore, S., D'Auria, E., Parisi, F., Concolino, D., Borrelli, O., Thapar, N., Staiano, A., Vandenplas, Y., & Saps, M. (2018). Cow's Milk Protein Allergy in Infancy: A Risk Factor for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Children?. Nutrients, 10(11), 1716. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111716[3] Kamiński, S., Cieslińska, A., & Kostyra, E. (2007). Polymorphism of bovine beta-casein and its potential effect on human health. Journal of applied genetics, 48(3), 189–198. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03195213[4] Defilippi, C., Gomez, E., Charlin, V., & Silva, C. (1995). Inhibition of small intestinal motility by casein: a role of beta casomorphins?. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 11(6), 751–754.[5] Defilippi, C., Gomez, E., Charlin, V., & Silva, C. (1995). Inhibition of small intestinal motility by casein: a role of beta casomorphins?. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 11(6), 751–754.[6] Brooke-Taylor, S., Dwyer, K., Woodford, K., & Kost, N. (2017). Systematic Review of the Gastrointestinal Effects of A1 Compared with A2 β-Casein. Advances in nutrition (Bethesda, Md.), 8(5), 739–748. https://doi.org/10.3945/an.116.013953